4 Reasons Electronic Devices Fail

Many reviewers on Britainreviews.co.uk. can’t believe their computer parts and iPhones are already failing and slowing down just days before the next generation is released. When a manufacturer tries to push a new product, the TV seems to be designed to have glitches. Light bulbs, computers, batteries, vehicles, and microchips are examples of items that marketers crack to get you to purchase more of the same thing. These four reasons explain what electronic gadgets often fail in their purposes.

·Producers’ aim

“Planned obsolescence is a phenomenon that has been around for a long time. God used it with people,” says Robert Orben, a well-known American entertainer.

Planned obsolescence aims to maximize profit through consistent sales, which means shortening the time between repeat purchases. Manufacturers claim that this strategy’s increased sales revenue more than compensates for the increased R&D costs.

Manufacturers won’t need to cut corners during the production process if we, the consumers, weren’t obsessed with keeping up with the latest trends and always wanting the latest and greatest gadgets as soon as possible. For example, instead of using a cheap plastic part in place of more expensive metal, a producer will stick to the best material if there is no urge to keep releasing new updates.

·Intended to fail

Several examples of expected obsolescence in motion, from cracked display glass on your smartphone, aren’t protected by the manufacturer’s warranty to unavailable replacement parts, wear and tear, and incompatibility. Where “the new thing just doesn’t fit with the … Read More

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